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Ontario Minimum Wage One Step Closer to $15

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Bill to Create Fair Workplaces and Better Jobs Passes Second Reading – Ontario Minimum Wage One Step Closer to $15 Per Hour, Equal Pay for Part-Time and Full-Time Workers

Today, Bill 148, the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017 passed second reading after debate in the Ontario Legislature.

The bill, if passed, would create more opportunity and security for workers by:

  • Raising Ontario’s general minimum wage to $14 per hour on January 1, 2018, and then to $15 on January 1, 2019, followed by annual increases at the rate of inflation
  • Mandating equal pay for part-time, temporary, casual and seasonal employees doing the same job as full-time employees; and equal pay for temporary help agency employees doing the same job as permanent employees at the agencies’ client companies
  • Expanding personal emergency leave to 10 days with an across-the-board minimum of at least two paid days per year for all workers
  • Providing up to 17 weeks off without the fear of losing their job when a worker or their child has experienced or is threatened with domestic or sexual violence
  • Bringing Ontario’s vacation time in line with the national average by ensuring at least three weeks vacation after five years with a company
  • Making employee scheduling fairer, including requiring employees to be paid for three hours of work if their shift is cancelled within 48 hours of its scheduled start time

The government will also propose measures to expand family leaves and make certain that employees are not misclassified as independent contractors, ensuring they get the benefits they deserve. To enforce these changes, the province will hire up to 175 more employment standards officers and launch a program to educate both employees and small and medium-sized businesses about their rights and obligations under the Employment Standards Act.

QUICK FACTS

  • The Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act responds to the final report of the Changing Workplaces Review. It was the first-ever independent review of the Employment Standards Act, 2000 and Labour Relations Act, 1995.
  • The Changing Workplaces Review Final Report estimated that more than 30 per cent of Ontario workers were in precarious work in 2014. This type of employment makes it hard to earn a decent income and interferes with opportunities to enjoy decent working conditions and/or puts workers at risk.
  • In 2016, the median hourly wage was $13.00 for part-time workers and $24.73 for full-time workers. Over the past 30 years, part-time work has grown to represent nearly 20 per cent of total employment.
  • Currently, half of the workers in Ontario earning less than $15 per hour are between the ages of 25 and 64, and the majority are women.
  • Studies show that a higher minimum wage results in less employee turnover, which increases business productivity.

    “Ontario workers deserve fair wages and safe working conditions. Too many families struggle to get by on part-time or temporary work. Those working full time can often live in poverty. This is unacceptable. If passed, Bill 148 will help ensure everyone who works hard has the chance to reach their full potential and share in Ontario’s prosperity.”— Kevin Flynn , Minister of Labour

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